Quarter Life Crisis

According to Wikipedia, the definition of a quarter-life crisis is “a period of life following the major changes of adolescence usually ranging from the late teens to the early thirties, in which a person begins to feel doubtful about their own lives, brought on by the stress of becoming an adult”.

I can’t identify a pivotal “crisis” stage of my twenties thus far, but I will admit that time seems to be gaining momentum whether or not I have checked off the ever-growing to-do-before-baby list I keep stashed in some corner of my prefrontal cortex*. Actually, I think I’ve been so caught up in the “doing” of life that I was looking for a pause button, and when I found one, I managed to read a few books “for fun”, including…

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The most valuable aspect of this book was the copious amount of reflective questions that centered around what the author terms “The Twenties Triangle”: Who am I? What do I want? How do I get what I want?

She highlights the notion of “having it all” that many Millennials** are all too familiar with, as well as providing reflections from older women about the danger of “not enough-ness” and discontent.

As a self-proclaimed control junkie, the reflective questions in this book helped me to recognize the value of “out-of-control” experiences in my life. After all, the notion that we are in the driver’s seat of our destiny is mostly an illusion. I can now appreciate that, because of those experiences, I have a clear notion of who I am, what I want, and what I am willing (or unwilling) to sacrifice in order to attain it.

…Bringing the pink-tinged perspective right back into focus.

 

 

*Cain’t nobody say I don’t use that psychology degree now, kin they?

** a.k.a Gen Y, or those of us coming of age year 2000ish, reeling from hyper-consumerism, body-image saturation and little-to-no concept of L.B.I. (life before internet)

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